As we mature, we learn to manage complex needs and agendas. So while a baby or toddler can only handle one thing at a time—I want to eat! Now!—adults usually juggle several of these at a time. I want to eat, but I’m going to wait for my partner to get home first. Also, while I crave sugar another part of me wants me to be healthy, and while I’m tired, another part of me values that I do try to cook… and so on. We are constantly managing competing interests within ourselves and our environment to stay as safe and healthy as possible.

Someone who is being repeatedly traumatized often has no model for how to do this. Pair it with a constantly heightened stress response, and you have a recipe for a lot of dysregulation and dissociation happening. That is complex trauma


findingmyrecovery:

Trying to communicate while dissociated from myself or reality

findingmyrecovery:

Trying to communicate while dissociated from myself or reality


stayherewithus:

Please stay here with us. 

stayherewithus:

Please stay here with us. 


askezzy:

I AM SUDDENLY VERY SAD AT THE AMOUNT OF PEOPLE REBLOGGING THAT DEPRESSION POST

THIS CALLS FOR BUNNY BUNS

SEVERAL OF THEM

image

BUNS TO THE RESCUE

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LOOK AT THAT FLOOF

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LOOK HES CALLING FOR CARROTS

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AND THIS ONE KNOWS HES FABULOUS

I FEEL BETTER NOW BYE

(via lookimazebra)


Fears are never as bad as we think when faced, their growl often turns into a whimper, it’s our imagination that makes us think differently.
Unknown (via psych-facts)




(via crusing)


But what shall I do when instead of a heart this fear is beating in my body?
Franz Kafka, Letters to Milena (via kafkaesque-world)

(via 5minutesofsolace)